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Rathore to serve on special board for pediatric infectious diseases

Published: August 3, 2016 By: Jesef Williams
Mobeen H. Rathore, M.B.B.S. (M.D.), CPE, FACPE, FIDSA, FAAP

Mobeen Rathore, MD, professor and associate chair of pediatrics at the University of Florida College of Medicine – Jacksonville, is taking on another leadership role in the area of children’s infectious diseases.

In January, Rathore will begin a six-year term on the sub-board on pediatric infectious diseases for the American Board of Pediatrics, which certifies physicians in more than 20 specialties. Rathore completed orientation in April and will attend his first sub-board meeting in November to further prepare for when he officially joins the group in the new year.

Rathore has worked in the specialty of pediatric infectious diseases for nearly 30 years as a clinician, educator and researcher. He was among the first physicians to be certified by the sub-board. He now looks forward to this new opportunity and believes he will bring much experience and perspective to the group.

“I have been active in the leadership of our professional society and have advocated for the best and brightest to come into our specialty,” he said.

Rathore is chief of the division of pediatric infectious diseases and immunology and director of the UF Center for HIV/AIDS Research, Education and Service (UF CARES) at UF COMJ. He started the first pediatric infectious diseases training program in Florida and continues to educate fellows locally and across the country.

In 2013, Rathore was appointed to the Committee on Infectious Diseases of the American Academy of Pediatrics. The committee is responsible for the publication of the “Red Book,” regarded worldwide as the most authoritative reference in the management of infectious diseases in children.

The committee publishes the “Red Book” every two years. It also regularly reports on important issues related to the management of emerging infectious diseases and makes recommendations on the use of vaccines.


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